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Favorite Cartoon TV Shows Growing Up

5 Shows & Movies | by Hannah McCarthy

CatDog

CatDog

Shows

CatDog is an American animated television series created for Nickelodeon by Peter Hannan. The series depicts the life of conjoined brothers, with one half being a cat and the other a dog. Nickelodeon produced the series from Burbank, California. The first episode aired on April 4, 1998, before the show officially premiered in October. The episode "Fetch" was also shown in theaters with The Rugrats Movie. Toward the end of the series run, a made-for-TV film was released, titled CatDog: The Great Parent Mystery. Reruns were played on Nicktoons until 2011 and later aired on TeenNick as part of The '90s Are All That block. The series is produced by Nickelodeon Animation Studio and Peter Hannan Productions and has been released on DVD.
Tom and Jerry

Tom and Jerry

Shows

Tom and Jerry is a series of theatrical animated cartoon films created by William Hanna and Joseph Barbera for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, centering on a rivalry between a cat and a mouse whose chases include slapstick comedy. Hanna and Barbera ultimately wrote, produced, and directed 114 Tom and Jerry shorts at MGM cartoon studios in Hollywood from 1940 to 1957. The original series is notable for having won seven Academy Awards, tying with Walt Disney's Silly Symphonies as the theatrical animated series with the most Oscars. A longtime television staple, Tom and Jerry has a worldwide audience and has been recognized as one of the most famous and longest-lived rivalries in American cinema. MGM released an additional 13 entries in 1961 produced by Rembrandt Films led by Gene Deitch in central Europe. Chuck Jones' Sib-Tower 12 Productions produced another 34 entries between 1963–1967, creating a total of 161 theatrical entries. Tom and Jerry resurfaced in made-for-television series produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions and Filmation Studios starting in the 1970s. The feature-length film Tom and Jerry: The Movie was released in 1992, and was followed by their first made-for-television short Tom and Jerry: The Mansion Cat for Boomerang. The most recent Tom and Jerry theatrical short, The Karate Guard, was written and co-directed by Barbera.
Rocko's Modern Life

Rocko's Modern Life

Shows

Rocko's Modern Life is an American animated series created by Joe Murray. The show aired for four seasons between 1993 and 1996 on Nickelodeon. Rocko's Modern Life is based around the surreal, parodic adventures of an anthropomorphic, Australian-immigrant wallaby named Rocko, and his new life in the city of O-Town. The show explores his American life as well as the lives of his friends: the gluttonous steer Heffer, the neurotic turtle Filburt, and Rocko's faithful dog, Spunky. The show is laden with adult humor, including double entendres, innuendos, and satirical social commentary. Joe Murray initially created the title character for an unpublished comic book series in the late 1980s, and later reluctantly pitched the series to Nickelodeon, who were looking for edgier cartoonists for their new Nicktoons block. The network gave the staff a large amount of creative freedom, the writers targeting both children and adults. The show's animation stylistically features crooked architecture. In addition, Murray picked many newcomer voice actors, such as Tom Kenny and Carlos Alazraqui, who have gone on to become very popular. The show was the fourth Nicktoon to premiere. Kenny described the show's impact in an interview, saying, "Rocko's Modern Life was just one of those shows that were the first break for a lot of people who went on to do other stuff in the business."
Courage the Cowardly Dog

Courage the Cowardly Dog

Shows

The bizarre misadventures of a cowardly dog named Courage and his elderly owners in a farmhouse in Nowhere, Kansas.
The Scooby-Doo Show

The Scooby-Doo Show

Shows

The Scooby-Doo Show is the blanket name for the episodes from the third incarnation of the Hanna-Barbera Saturday morning cartoon Scooby-Doo. A total of 40 episodes ran for three seasons, from 1976 to 1978, on ABC, marking the first Scooby series to appear on the network. Sixteen episodes were produced as segments of The Scooby-Doo/Dynomutt Hour in 1976, eight episodes were produced as segments of Scooby's All-Star Laff-A-Lympics in 1977 and sixteen episodes were produced in 1978, with nine of them running by themselves under the Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! name and the final seven as segments of Scooby's All-Stars. Despite the yearly changes in the way they were broadcast, the 1976–1978 stretch of Scooby episodes represents, at three seasons, the longest-running format of the original show before the addition of Scrappy-Doo. The episodes from all three seasons have been rerun under the title The Scooby-Doo Show since 1980; these Scooby episodes did not originally air under this title. The credits on these syndicated versions all feature a 1976 copyright date, even though some were originally produced in 1977 and 1978. Reruns are currently air on Boomerang. Like many animated series created by Hanna-Barbera in the 1970s, the show contained a laugh track created by the studio.